3.2 Nuchal Translucency Assessment

For all Obstetrics scans, no special preparation is needed, although it is best to wear loose clothing that can easily be lifted or removed in order to expose your abdomen. You will lie on your back on an examination couch and the transducer moved back and forth across your stomach in order to gain the best possible image of the fetus. Ultrasound imaging in pregnancy is widely used to evaluate the baby. It can determine if a baby is present, the position of the fetus and if there is a multiple pregnancy. It can also help to diagnose abnormalities or problems, help determine the age of the pregnancy and subsequent due date as well as showing the position of the placenta in relation to the birth canal. There is also then a routine scan at 20 weeks. Individual circumstances may dictate that more scans may be offered and a breakdown of what you could receive is detailed below. This usually takes place at 6 to 10 weeks of pregnancy. The scan can confirm the number of babies in the uterus, the embryo can be observed and measured by about five and a half weeks and a heartbeat usually detected by 6 weeks. Scans at this stage in pregnancy are reassuring for women experiencing bleeding, pain or who have had previous miscarriages.

Obstetric (Pregnancy)

Nuchal translucency NT is the sonographic appearance of a collection of fluid under the skin behind the fetal neck in the first-trimester of pregnancy. The term translucency is used, irrespective of whether it is septated or not and whether it is confined to the neck or envelopes the whole fetus. In fetuses with chromosomal abnormalities, cardiac defects and many genetic syndromes the NT thickness is increased.

The Fetal Medicine Foundation FMF has introduced a process of comprehensive training, support and audit for the proper implementation of early screening for chromosomal abnormalities.

Translucency (NT) of your baby has been found to be mm or more. A raised NT does not Nuchal translucency (NT) is the appearance on a scan, of a collection of fluid under the skin Date of publication: June Date of review: June.

Visit NHS Choices for a detailed pregnancy and baby guide with lots of useful tips for parents to be. Act now to protect your baby from whooping cough from birth. You can request the vaccination from your midwife after your 20 week scan at your antenatal appointment or you can just turn up to Floor 1, Maternity between Monday — Friday 9am -5pm. It’s used to see how far along in your pregnancy you are and check your baby’s development. This assesses the risk of Down Syndrome in babies.

It is an optional test. You can book this at the same time as your 20 week scan. You will want to book onto an Antenatal Pregnancy Class. Plan your route to the hospital and how long it would take to get there. Cookie Settings This site uses cookies to store information on your computer, to improve your experience.

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Screening for nuchal translucency

There are a number of tests and scans available to you during your pregnancy. The nuchal translucency scan is an ultrasound that may detect the risk of a number of chromosomal abnormalities. A nuchal translucency scan is part of the ultrasound scan that most pregnant women have at around 12 weeks of pregnancy. The results of a nuchal translucency scan may tell you if your baby has a high or low risk of a chromosomal abnormality. Examples of chromosomal abnormalities include trisomy 21 Down syndrome , trisomy 18 Edwards syndrome or trisomy 13 Patau syndrome.

Your baby’s NT or nuchal translucency. This is a part of your scan that you can opt out of but, combined with a blood test, this measurement of.

Nuchal translucency is the name for the normal fluid space behind the neck of a foetus unborn baby that can be seen on ultrasound scans. A nuchal translucency scan also called first trimester of pregnancy screening is carried out during weeks 11—13 of a pregnancy. The scan uses ultrasound to screen for Down syndrome, or other chromosomal or inherited conditions in the foetus. Other non-chromosomal conditions, such as neural tube defects, abdominal wall defects, limb abnormalities and some congenital heart disease, can also be detected at this stage of the pregnancy.

Screening can determine the likelihood of risk of an abnormality, but does not diagnose the condition. If screening does identify a possible risk, it does not necessarily mean there is an abnormality present, but does mean that further testing is necessary. Women who return a high-risk result from the screening will be offered formal genetic testing using other procedures, such as amniocentesis or chorion villus sampling CVS.

Dating scans

Normal babies accumulate fluid under the skin behind the head and neck between 9 and 14 weeks of pregnancy, however, excess fluid has been associated with chromosome abnormalities such as Down syndrome. The Nuchal Translucency NT tends to be larger in a baby that might be affected by a chromosome abnormality and it can be compared with what is expected for a baby of the same size NT Normal Range.

The assessment of these elements age, blood, scan combined give us a comprehensive understanding of the likelihood of your baby being affected by a chromosome abnormality.

At 8 to 14 weeks of pregnancy, you should be offered a pregnancy dating scan. The nuchal translucency measurement can be taken during the dating scan.

Learn about our expanded patient care options for your health care needs. Combined first-trimester nuchal translucency screening is a noninvasive screening test for fetal Down syndrome and trisomies 13 and Prenatal genetic counseling services are also provided in conjunction with first-trimester screening, if requested.

If you are a health care provider referring your patient to Johns Hopkins for first-trimester screening, learn more here. Down syndrome and trisomies 13 and 18 are chromosomal disorders that cause intellectual disability and birth defects. Trisomy 18 having an extra 18th chromosome and trisomy 13 having an extra 13th chromosome are more severe disorders that cause profound intellectual disability and severe birth defects in many organ systems.

Few babies with trisomies 13 or 18 survive more than a few months. What can combined first-trimester screening tell me about my pregnancy? Combined first-trimester screening is not a diagnostic test, which means it cannot tell you whether your baby has Down syndrome, trisomy 13 or trisomy Instead, the screening provides a probability that the baby might have Down syndrome, trisomy 13 or trisomy This probability, or chance, is based on three criteria: your age, information obtained on an ultrasound and bloodwork.

The screening results can either alert you and your doctor that your baby is at an increased risk for one of these chromosomal disorders or be reassuring that your baby is at a lower risk for these conditions.

Screening throughout Pregnancy and After Birth

Section 3. If it is not possible to obtain the nuchal translucency NT measurement at the first appointment, at least one other attempt should be offered. This may be on the same day or at a later date. The best time for women to have this scan is in early pregnancy between 11 weeks plus 2 days and 14 weeks plus one day crown rump length

The dating and/or nuchal translucency scan is the first routine scan. This first routine scan is carried out for the following reasons: to confirm when.

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Nuchal translucency (NT) scan

Pelvis or abdomen, pregnancy related or pregnancy complication, ultrasound scan of, by any or all approaches, for determining the gestation, location, viability or number of foetuses, if the dating of the pregnancy as confirmed by ultrasound is less than 12 weeks of gestation. Pelvis or abdomen, pregnancy related or pregnancy complication, fetal development and anatomy, ultrasound scan of, by any or all approaches, if:.

Pelvis or abdomen, pregnancy related or pregnancy complication, fetal development and anatomy, ultrasound scan of, by any or all approaches, for determining the structure, gestation, location, viability or number of foetuses, if the dating of the pregnancy as confirmed by ultrasound is 12 to 16 weeks of gestation.

Nuchal Translucency Scan – This is also offered to pregnant mums at the same time as the Dating Scan. This assesses the risk of Down Syndrome in babies.

Obstetric ultrasound is currently utilised as part of routine pregnancy care and is considered a safe examination without any known significant risks to the mother or baby. Ultrasound can be performed at various stages of the pregnancy and common types of examinations include:. Online Referring Telehealth information — Practitioners can now refer patients electronically for medical imaging. All referrals accepted.

Ultrasound – Obstetric. What type of Ultrasound?

What Do They Do At A Nuchal Scan


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